What happens when Harrison Ford meets the Indonesian Minister of Forestry to confront him about corruption and illegal logging that’s quickly destroying nature preserves.
 
—
Part of an eye-opening 9-part Showtime series; Years of Living Dangerously.
Harrison Ford is the Vice Chair of Conservation International, and a very passionate leader and campaigner for global sustainability and conservation issues.
 

What happens when Harrison Ford meets the Indonesian Minister of Forestry to confront him about corruption and illegal logging that’s quickly destroying nature preserves.

 

Part of an eye-opening 9-part Showtime series; Years of Living Dangerously.

Harrison Ford is the Vice Chair of Conservation International, and a very passionate leader and campaigner for global sustainability and conservation issues.

 

laboratoryequipment:

Humanity’s Environmental Footprint Isn’t Sustainable
Substantial, fundamental changes in the world economy are required to reduce humanity’s overall environmental footprint to a sustainable level.


This is the conclusion of Arjen Hoekstra, professor of Water Management at the Univ. of Twente.
He has published his findings in Science.Hoekstra, mainly known for his work on the water footprint, has published the research together with his counterpart Thomas Wiedmann, from the Univ. of New South Wales in Australia. In Science, the authors describe how intertwined the global economy, politics, consumption and trade are in their effect on global land, water and raw material consumption and on the climate.Read more:
http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/humanitys-environmental-footprint-isnt-sustainable

laboratoryequipment:

Humanity’s Environmental Footprint Isn’t Sustainable


Substantial, fundamental changes in the world economy are required to reduce humanity’s overall environmental footprint to a sustainable level.

This is the conclusion of Arjen Hoekstra, professor of Water Management at the Univ. of Twente.

He has published his findings in Science.

Hoekstra, mainly known for his work on the water footprint, has published the research together with his counterpart Thomas Wiedmann, from the Univ. of New South Wales in Australia. In Science, the authors describe how intertwined the global economy, politics, consumption and trade are in their effect on global land, water and raw material consumption and on the climate.

Read more:

http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/humanitys-environmental-footprint-isnt-sustainable

Reblogged from temporaryorbit

temporaryorbit:

Waves filled with trash. 

And it’s getting worse 

and worse.

*Trash wave, Indonesia. 

—-

"Awareness" can only go so far. What is needed are simple route to action.

——

Here’s one idea from TM™

Viewers should be able to roll over each product in each of these images of trash in nature.

There, they can find a brand, a manufacturer, etc;

then they can click-to-send a demand for sustainable packaging options.

And they can share it across social media.

List out the worst offenders, and attempt to track it all back.

Do it for all photos, in the pacific garbage patch, etc. 

It’s simple way to activate these photos. If you have the resources and the reach, contact me and I’ll give a free consultation/ blueprint on how to get it done. 

Less talk. More action.

—-

We should also ban the microbead.

All those facial scrubs with ‘Microbead’ cleansers? Just tiny bits of plastic companies put into their products – allowed to wash down drains into the ocean to mess with ecosystems.

Guess they were hoping you wouldn’t notice:

'Polyethylene' is just another word for plastic.

It’s also in your toothpaste and your gum. For ‘decorative’ purposes only. You swallow it, and it is also washed down the drain.

——

A great new app lets you scan products to determine their impact on the environment – before you buy.

Download it here, for free:

ThinkDirty

——

[ Plastic bird from NPR story on Chris Jordan’s photography work ]

Reblogged from temporaryorbit

temporaryorbit:

Via Salon
We haven’t yet reached the point when we need to start seriously considering launching our trash into space, but humanity’s garbage has already found its way to places where no man has gone before.
European scientists working to map the ocean floor say they found trash everywhere they went, at points nearly 15,000 feet deep and as far away as 1,200 miles from the nearest human settlement. They turned up plastic, discarded fishing nets and lines, glass, metal, wood, paper and cardboard, clothing, pottery and other, unidentified materials…the entire report of their “discovery,” which they wrote up…reads like a nightmare — one that’s set in a very densely packed dump. 
Read More…

temporaryorbit:

Via Salon

We haven’t yet reached the point when we need to start seriously considering launching our trash into space, but humanity’s garbage has already found its way to places where no man has gone before.

European scientists working to map the ocean floor say they found trash everywhere they went, at points nearly 15,000 feet deep and as far away as 1,200 miles from the nearest human settlement. They turned up plastic, discarded fishing nets and lines, glass, metal, wood, paper and cardboard, clothing, pottery and other, unidentified materials…the entire report of their “discovery,” which they wrote up…reads like a nightmare — one that’s set in a very densely packed dump. 

Read More…

Reblogged from temporaryorbit

temporaryorbit:

Humans. We’re killing ourselves.

- Approximately 50% of land that could support tropical rain forests has already been lost to human activities. 

- A swath the size of Florida is destroyed every year. One entire football field is cut per second.

- The effect on biodiversity will be profound: 50% of all the world’s species are threatened with extinction because of deforestation. It is estimated that 1 rainforest species is now being pushed to extinction every 2 minutes.

- This loss of rain forest, unchecked – to fuel population growth, commerce and industry – will amount one of the greatest atrocities mankind has every inflicted upon itself. 

- Countless life-saving medicines have come from species that only exist in rain forests, and millions of plants and animals have yet to be discovered. 

Tropical rain forests produce about 30% of our planet’s fresh water. 

- The Amazon has lost about 18% of its rainforest, while 50% has been damaged by fragmentation.

- The highest rate of deforestation is occurring in Southeast Asia, where about 70% of the area is now deforested (approximately two million hectares per year.

- Originally, tropical rain forests covered 15-18 million km2 of land surface, but by 1989 this area had been cut to less than half.

- Logging, land grabs, farming and palm oil plantations have had the most impact on rain forests. Corruption has allowed much to go unregulated. Meanwhile, the majority of multinational corporations that rely on palm oils have put profits ahead of sustainability. From toothpaste to beauty products to processed foods – these cheap, modern conveniences have generated billions of dollars in profit and have come at a tragic, yet mostly hidden, price to humanity.

- At the current rate, all rain forest and the biodiversity that can only exist there – disappear in less than 50 years.

- If the rate increases exponentially, at the same rate of human population growing in tropical countries (2.3% annually):

—-

All rain forests are projected to disappear in less than 30 years – along with 50% of all species on earth. 

—-

One of the world’s largest palm oil traders, Wilmar international, is a Singapore-based company that controls 45 percent of the world’s palm oil market. This palm oil supplies household brands such as Procter & Gamble, Mondelez and Reckitt Benckiser.

They’ve faced huge pressure from NGOs to develop more environmentally sustainable practices. 

In 2013, Unilever was one of the first multinational corporations to take a sizable step, asking Wilmar to pledge that 100 percent of the palm oil used in its supply chain would by fully traceable by the end of 2014.

But that’s just one deal and there’s still more to be done. What can you do to apply more pressure?

Post, share, use your skills in any way you can to spread this message. Beyond raising awareness, think of how you can use your creativity to affect real change. If you work in marketing or advertising, do your research. Have the difficult conversations. If you’re not in the position to, pass it up the ranks. Every single decision has impact now, and people must own up not just on principle – but for the sake of all human civilization. 

Follow (and donate to) these NGOs:

Conservation International

The Nature Conservancy

Greenpeace

But we need to do much more.

All the awareness and lobbying in the world has yet to stem the destruction.  We need a sea change of sentiment. We need to shine direct light not only on ourselves – but also the governments, corporations, and supply chains that continue to destroy these biodiversity hot spots.

This isn’t a call for fringe activism or boycotts. We need pressure and constructive results. I’d love to talk with potential partners about other ways we could affect real change, and do it on a non-profit basis.

If you are a programmer, a developer, a graphic designer, an investor, a product designer or technologist - contact me, on a pro-bono basis.

I have projects to address these issues. Let’s discuss what we can do together. 

Reblogged from temporaryorbit

The NYC dating scene is hard. Especially for creative types.
My friend found this today on the street. It has a lot of stopping power.
The work itself says he’s an artist. Since it was found on the street, that would make him a street artist. But I’m assuming he’s a graphic artist based on some clues that point to a strong foundation in at least the industrial arts, like drafting. 
He does seem to prefer the Swiss School movement of graphic design though, based on his fondness for the grid. But unlike much of the Swiss School, the composition is very centered, with quite a lot of visual weight drawing the eye straight down to the base of the typography (which almost stretches end-to-end, interestingly). It’s as if he’s saying ‘I am on a solid foundation. I am here.’ The archetypal protector, so to speak. 
But there is quite a lot of tension in the design, as well as in his expression, even though he’s really trying to smile. But he doesn’t want you to look at his face. No, he’s calling the viewer in, closer, to see past a visual representation of this man on the poster – (which may not even be the artist himself) – to see what’s inside. Maybe that’s what he means by ‘morphing into something profound.’ It’s a wink by the artist for the lucky lady who can really see that. He’s not trying to reach some casual audience of ‘singles scene’ girls passing by in their heels on a night out on the town. 
No, he appreciates their shape and their form, but he doesn’t need a muse. He’s looking for a connoisseur. And he makes that very clear. It’s telegraphed like a glowing Tracy Emin piece: 
This girl knows who she is.

The NYC dating scene is hard. Especially for creative types.

My friend found this today on the street. It has a lot of stopping power.

The work itself says he’s an artist. Since it was found on the street, that would make him a street artist. But I’m assuming he’s a graphic artist based on some clues that point to a strong foundation in at least the industrial arts, like drafting.

He does seem to prefer the Swiss School movement of graphic design though, based on his fondness for the grid. But unlike much of the Swiss School, the composition is very centered, with quite a lot of visual weight drawing the eye straight down to the base of the typography (which almost stretches end-to-end, interestingly). It’s as if he’s saying ‘I am on a solid foundation. I am here.’ The archetypal protector, so to speak.

But there is quite a lot of tension in the design, as well as in his expression, even though he’s really trying to smile. But he doesn’t want you to look at his face. No, he’s calling the viewer in, closer, to see past a visual representation of this man on the poster – (which may not even be the artist himself) – to see what’s inside. Maybe that’s what he means by ‘morphing into something profound.’ It’s a wink by the artist for the lucky lady who can really see that. He’s not trying to reach some casual audience of ‘singles scene’ girls passing by in their heels on a night out on the town.

No, he appreciates their shape and their form, but he doesn’t need a muse. He’s looking for a connoisseur. And he makes that very clear. It’s telegraphed like a glowing Tracy Emin piece:

This girl knows who she is.